Tag: medicine

Inside the Pill

By: Mariel Sander The first time I went to the gynecologist’s office for a checkup, I had no idea what to expect. Though my doctor was friendly, capable, and patient, I left the office with a month’s worth of birth control pills and no information on their biological effects. I didn’t know what side effects

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Adopting Orphaned Diseases

By: Cheryl Pan Determining how many diseases that affect humans is a very difficult task. Calculating the exact number of available treatments is even harder, if not impossible. While extensive research is being conducted on some of the most widely known diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and diabetes, other diseases are given relatively much less priority.

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Digital Pills: Biomedical Big Brother, or Ethical Public Health Tool?

By: Kelly Butler On November 13th, the Food And Drug Administration (FDA) approved Abilify MyCite, the first medication tracking system intended for public use. While the schizophrenia drug Abilify has been on the market for decades, the new Abilify MyCite system includes an ingestible sensor and wearable receiver patch, which detects when patients swallow the

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Safeguarding Stem Cell Implants

By: Kendra Zhong After suffering a stroke in 2009, Jim Gass was confronted with a flaccid left arm and weak left leg. He then decided to take what many would consider a dream vacation: traveling to various countries in North America, South America, and Asia. However, Gass wasn’t chasing tourist traps—he was chasing promises of

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Two New Developments in Medicine: PSCK9 Inhibitors and the WATCHMAN Device

By: Tiago Palmisano Edited By: Bryce Harlan One reason I love biology is that despite centuries of research and discovery, we are continuously gaining new insight into the machinations of the human body. Even today our understanding of medicine is expanding as biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies strive to develop more sophisticated strategies for combating disease.

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A Fight Against Doom; The Remarkable Story of The Milwaukee Protocol

By: Tiago Palmisano Edited By: Bryce Harlan Before the evolution of modern medicine, a fight with disease was all too often a sentence of doom. The lack of knowledge concerning antibodies and vaccines left doctors with a weak defense against the majority of illnesses, which understandably led to a longstanding association between sickness and the

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Cryonics: Freezing in Time

By: Kimberley Shen Edited by: Arianna Winchester On January 8, 2015, a two-year old Thai girl named Matheryn Naovaratpong died of ependymoblastoma, a rare form of brain cancer. Over the course of almost a year, she had 12 brain surgeries, 20 chemotherapy treatments, and 20 radiation therapy sessions. However, in spite of her doctors’ best

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Nobel Prize Winners Herald Natural-Based Medicines

Written By: Jack Zhong Edited By: Josephine McGowan On October 6, 2015, the Nobel Prize for Medicine and Physiology was awarded to William C. Campbell and Satoshi Ōmura for “their discoveries concerning a novel therapy against infections caused by roundworm parasites.” Youyou Tu also shared this prize for “her discoveries concerning a novel therapy against Malaria.”

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Herbal Medicine

By: Yameng Zhang Edited By: Thomas Luh What is herbal medicine? According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, Herbal medicine—also called botanical medicine or phytomedicine—refers to using a plant’s seeds, berries, roots, leaves, bark, or flowers for medicinal purposes. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2015 was awarded to a further application of herbal

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Protecting Our Defenses: Our Extensive Use of Antibiotics Reduces the Diversity of the Microbiome

By: Tiago Palmisano Edited By: Arianna Winchester One of the greatest accomplishments of civilization is our ability to purposefully modify the natural world. Scientific research has taught us that we are surrounded by microorganisms too small to see with the naked eye. Of the hundred trillion cells that constitute the average human body, only ten

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