Category: brains

The Role of Our Immune System in Alzheimer’s

By: Mariel Corinne Tai Sander Edited by: Kim Chia In 1907, at a conference in Tubingen, Dr. Alois Alzheimer described a curious disease characterized by “numerous small miliary foci…found in the superior layers…the storage of a peculiar material in the cortex” [1]. While researchers now know what those “small military foci” are—plaques of beta amyloid

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Neuroscience’s Take on the Supernatural: Are Near Death Experiences Real?

By: Aditya Nair It’s a tale that seems as old as history. Those among us who have come very close to dying report extraordinarily vivid visions involving some combination of seeing the dead, passing through a tunnel, feeling dissociated from the body, and extreme emotional states among many other phenomena collectively referred to as near

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Yogurt and Your Brain: New Evidence Suggests a Link Between Probiotics and Mental Health

By: Tiago Palmisano Edited by: Bryce Harlan It’s well known in the medical community that gut-bacteria produce beneficial effects. Commercials about probiotics – bacteria and yeast that provide benefits for human health– have become as prolific as prescription drug advertisements, and yogurts laced with specific strains of bacteria are now a fitness craze. Though generally

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How Love Works: Part 2 – Neurotransmitters and Genetic Factors

By: Aditya Nair Edited by: Bryce Harlan Now that we’ve gone over some of the reasons why the development of love may have been an evolutionary advantage, let’s move on to the nitty-gritty aspects of love. What do we know about what actually happens in the brain when we fall in love? We turn to

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Honeybees and Horcruxes

Check out this awesome article from Seed Magazine. The idea of insect colonies and brains having similar properties is not new (Godel Escher Bach…) but this research is the first effort to formally explore the parallel. Social insect colonies have a singular, emergent “mind,” but their intelligence is distributed in little pieces across hundreds or

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Wikipedia Gets More Legit

Earlier this week, The Society for Neuroscience launched the Neuroscience Wikipedia Initiative, a call for neuroscientists around the world to “harness the power of Wikipedia and support the Society’s mission of promoting public education about neuroscience.” We all know that wikipedia is “not a reputable source.” But I must admit that, when curiosity strikes, wikiing

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