Author: spreadscienceblog

Winter is Coming—So Eat Your Vitamins

By: Sophia Ahmed Idyllic tree-lightings, holiday breaks, and gently-falling snow all come along with December in New York City. But as wintertime approaches, so do exams, campus viruses, and seasonal slumps. With increasing stress and colder temperatures, late night trips to JJ’s to seek comfort food may become more frequent. As you start to fill

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Flawed Forensics: The Innocence Project’s 25th Anniversary

By Sonia Mahajan   This year marks the Innocence Project’s 25th anniversary. Created in 1992, the Innocence Project aims to “[exonerate] the wrongly convicted through DNA testing and [reform] the criminal justice system to prevent future injustices.” As of this article’s publication, the organization has used DNA evidence to exonerate 351 people. The Innocence Project identifies

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Safeguarding Stem Cell Implants

By: Kendra Zhong After suffering a stroke in 2009, Jim Gass was confronted with a flaccid left arm and weak left leg. He then decided to take what many would consider a dream vacation: traveling to various countries in North America, South America, and Asia. However, Gass wasn’t chasing tourist traps—he was chasing promises of

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Harvey’s Hidden Storm

By: Sophia Ahmed Hurricane Katrina’s Category 5 winds killed nearly 2,000 people when the storm made landfall in August 2005, and Hurricane Harvey damaged an estimated 203,000 homes. Combined, these hurricanes caused destruction that totaled over 400 billion U.S. dollars. Needless to say, hurricanes cause extensive damage to families and infrastructure when their winds rip

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The Evolution of Personality

By Sean Harris Everyday observations show us that people exhibit a wide variety of personality traits; some people are outgoing, some creative, and others nurturing. This variation is not trivial, as personality deeply affects the way people think and act. Given the far-reaching consequences of personality, it’s important to investigate why people have certain traits

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A New Wave of Astronomy: Detection of Gravitational Waves from Neutron Star Pairs

By: Manasi Sharma Though the transition from weekend to weekday brings an onslaught of cold, dreary panic to most fall Monday mornings here in New York, the morning of Monday October 16, 2017 could not have been more different. The excitement in the air was palpable as members of Columbia’s scientific community—students, professors, and visitors alike—waited

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Hacking Health: Cybersecurity in Medical Devices and Healthcare

By Audrey Lee When you hear the term “Internet of things” (IoT), what is the first device that comes to mind? You might picture the smartphone you’ve come to heavily rely on, a fitness tracker that monitors your activity throughout the day, or even a smart home that is energy efficient. But even something as

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Petri Dish Burger, Anyone?

By Kanishk Karan Creating living things from petri dishes has always been the stuff of science fiction and even horror, but these days, lab-grown, or cultured, meat has become more of a reality than ever before. As far-fetched as it may sound, researchers at Memphis Meats – a San Francisco based food technology company –

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Let’s Not Sugarcoat It

By Mariel Sander Columbia students are no strangers to sugar. Sometimes it seems like not a week goes by without a club or company giving out free Insomnia cookies on Low Beach or selling Krispy Kremes in Lerner. So when my roommate Amelia told me she’d gone “sugar-free” over the summer, I laughed. We had consumed

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No Professor, It Isn’t Obvious.

How reductive language limits students’ learning in STEM classrooms at Columbia. By: Maria MacArdle “But obviously, the rest is self-explanatory.” Your professor puts down the chalk, turns to their notes, and prepares to move to the next topic. Your stomach drops. You look down at the unfinished derivation in your notes and at the QED

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