Inside the Pill

By: Mariel Sander The first time I went to the gynecologist’s office for a checkup, I had no idea what to expect. Though my doctor was friendly, capable, and patient, I left the office with a month’s worth of birth control pills and no information on their biological effects. I didn’t know what side effects

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Reversing Racial Bias in Children – Exposure is Key

By: Georgina Gonzalez Children are like sponges. They soak up everything around them, absorbing every new experience and sensation. Their developing brains attempt to process the influx of information that comes as they navigate the world around them, and slowly, they begin to learn. It’s no doubt that they quickly become products of their environments

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Adopting Orphaned Diseases

By: Cheryl Pan Determining how many diseases that affect humans is a very difficult task. Calculating the exact number of available treatments is even harder, if not impossible. While extensive research is being conducted on some of the most widely known diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and diabetes, other diseases are given relatively much less priority.

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Cooking with Hominids

By: Sirena Khanna Food is often on our minds. We are the only species that watches competitive baking, eats tropical fruit in freezing climates, and adorns our food with gold. The mass production, transport, and consumption of foods from all over the world are feats that can only be derived by the human brain, and

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Breaking the Limitations of Solar Energy

Sophia Ahmed New York City aims to install  1 gigawatt of solar capacity by 2030, which could power approximately 250,000 households. This would give these 250,000 households not only cleaner, but also cheaper energy; the average Brooklyn household could save $64,796 over 20 years with investment in solar energy. Additionally, using solar power in place

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Minimalist Lungs

by Tanvi Hisaria  A small drop of red liquid blossoms into dark clouds in a little glass dish on 168th Street. Just like that, new hope is born for the thousands of sufferers of pulmonary fibrosis and respiratory tract infections. In a paper published in Nature Cell Biology, Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) recently announced its latest

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Winter is Coming—So Eat Your Vitamins

By: Sophia Ahmed Idyllic tree-lightings, holiday breaks, and gently-falling snow all come along with December in New York City. But as wintertime approaches, so do exams, campus viruses, and seasonal slumps. With increasing stress and colder temperatures, late night trips to JJ’s to seek comfort food may become more frequent. As you start to fill

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Flawed Forensics: The Innocence Project’s 25th Anniversary

By Sonia Mahajan   This year marks the Innocence Project’s 25th anniversary. Created in 1992, the Innocence Project aims to “[exonerate] the wrongly convicted through DNA testing and [reform] the criminal justice system to prevent future injustices.” As of this article’s publication, the organization has used DNA evidence to exonerate 351 people. The Innocence Project identifies

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Safeguarding Stem Cell Implants

By: Kendra Zhong After suffering a stroke in 2009, Jim Gass was confronted with a flaccid left arm and weak left leg. He then decided to take what many would consider a dream vacation: traveling to various countries in North America, South America, and Asia. However, Gass wasn’t chasing tourist traps—he was chasing promises of

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Harvey’s Hidden Storm

By: Sophia Ahmed Hurricane Katrina’s Category 5 winds killed nearly 2,000 people when the storm made landfall in August 2005, and Hurricane Harvey damaged an estimated 203,000 homes. Combined, these hurricanes caused destruction that totaled over 400 billion U.S. dollars. Needless to say, hurricanes cause extensive damage to families and infrastructure when their winds rip

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